30 8 / 2014

cloudiiedays:

Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) by Rachel Hardy (8TwilightAngel8)

cloudiiedays:

Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) by Rachel Hardy (8TwilightAngel8)

(via repti-world)

30 8 / 2014

smirkylittleshit:

Instagram Missjessejean
Just hangin’ out with sarahbane666  Send help, I’m drowning in my own boobs.
nickdillinger my photography favorite

smirkylittleshit:

Instagram Missjessejean

Just hangin’ out with sarahbane666
Send help, I’m drowning in my own boobs.

nickdillinger my photography favorite

(via in-love-with-a-curvy-nerd)

29 8 / 2014

applescruff-s:

chief-blue-meanie:

chief-blue-meanie:

“I keep rearranging the letters of my sisters The Beatles sign on her bedroom door.

She is not happy.” 

I’ve given up trying to make them normal.

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

ok and now there’s another one

image

this is great

This reminds me of the Fawlty Towers sign. That too resulted in the best kind of nonsense.

(via timidkoala)

29 8 / 2014

29 8 / 2014

workingamerica:

Hmm. Looks like opponents of our campaign to Raise The Minimum Wage are running out of arguments.
Text RAISE to 30644 and join our fight for fair wages. http://ift.tt/1A2tAHc

workingamerica:

Hmm. Looks like opponents of our campaign to Raise The Minimum Wage are running out of arguments.

Text RAISE to 30644 and join our fight for fair wages. http://ift.tt/1A2tAHc

(via pocketfulofgeek)

29 8 / 2014

Virginia Simms

Virginia Simms

(Source: undressed-amateurs, via theunsatisfieddick)

28 8 / 2014

wefuckinglovescience:

Bilateral gynandromorphs - animals that are literally half male and half female. More info: http://bit.ly/Ht5Hl6 Images via Scientific Illustration for the Research Scientist | somersault18:24.

wefuckinglovescience:

Bilateral gynandromorphs - animals that are literally half male and half female.

More info: http://bit.ly/Ht5Hl6

Images via Scientific Illustration for the Research Scientist | somersault18:24.

28 8 / 2014

  • 1: better stop off at the next motorway services since i've been driving for 3 hours, which is 1 hour more than the highway code recommends!!
  • 2: yeah it's a pretty short drive only like 47 hours if i don't stop

28 8 / 2014

blackfemalepresident:

old ass ppl talk shit about my generation until they accidentally disable their wifi and cant figure out how to turn it back on

then im suddenly the mastermind of information & resources

(via fatassbigknits)

28 8 / 2014

27 8 / 2014

Day 2/7 of the One Piece anniversary week.
Favorite antagonist: Smoker
"I’m sorry my pants ate your ice cream. Here, go buy yourself five scoops.”

(Source: -dandelions, via fuckyeahonepiece)

27 8 / 2014

llbwwb:

Eying the Lens- —Mike Roberts

llbwwb:

Eying the Lens- —Mike Roberts

(via heckyeahreptiles)

27 8 / 2014

ewilloughby:

Diagnostic anatomical reconstruction of Deinonychus antirrhopus, intended loosely for Wikipedia but also as an experimental piece to show pretty much exactly how I believe this animal looked in life.
This was largely inspired by an interesting Facebook discussion with paleoartist Julius Csotonyi about arm-folding in paravian dinosaurs. It occurred to me that people seldom reconstruct paravians, particularly dromaeosaurs, with their arms folded in a reasonable and accurate way. Julius made the fair the point that these animals probably didn’t carry their arms out in front of the body, as is so often depicted (in skeletals and otherwise — it makes sense in skeletals, to adequately show the hand and arm anatomy), because such an awkward orientation would leave the hand and arm feathers open to damage and breakage. But they also can’t fold them tightly against the breast or back like birds do, because they lack the mobility to do so.
So how did Deinonychus normally carry its arms? Senter’s 2006 paper on forelimb function in Deinonychus and Bambiraptor shows that the humerus couldn’t rotate much past the horizontal with respect to the scapula. In addition, Sullivan et al. 2010 — winningly translated to layman coherency by Matt Martyniuk — shows that wrist mobility in many paravians is much less than you might expect, given their similarity to birds. The wrist of Deinonychus antirrhopus specifically would not have allowed it to bend its hands even 90° with respect to the arm!
Given these limitations, most of the flexion would have to occur at the elbow, but a fully flexed elbow would mean that the hands would be hanging below the body, not held sleek and secure alongside the body. The arm orientation in my illustration above is based on what I think is probably the perfect configuration for carrying the arms: a fully-flexed shoulder, a fully-flexed wrist, and a nearly fully-extended elbow. A few other people have drawn their dromaeosaurs with the same arm configuration, like Smnt2000 and Pilsator, so kudos to them.
Illustration based on the papers linked above as well as Scott Hartman's beautiful skeletal. Gouache on 12” x 20” hot-pressed illustration board.

ewilloughby:

Diagnostic anatomical reconstruction of Deinonychus antirrhopus, intended loosely for Wikipedia but also as an experimental piece to show pretty much exactly how I believe this animal looked in life.

This was largely inspired by an interesting Facebook discussion with paleoartist Julius Csotonyi about arm-folding in paravian dinosaurs. It occurred to me that people seldom reconstruct paravians, particularly dromaeosaurs, with their arms folded in a reasonable and accurate way. Julius made the fair the point that these animals probably didn’t carry their arms out in front of the body, as is so often depicted (in skeletals and otherwise — it makes sense in skeletals, to adequately show the hand and arm anatomy), because such an awkward orientation would leave the hand and arm feathers open to damage and breakage. But they also can’t fold them tightly against the breast or back like birds do, because they lack the mobility to do so.

So how did Deinonychus normally carry its arms? Senter’s 2006 paper on forelimb function in Deinonychus and Bambiraptor shows that the humerus couldn’t rotate much past the horizontal with respect to the scapula. In addition, Sullivan et al. 2010 — winningly translated to layman coherency by Matt Martyniuk — shows that wrist mobility in many paravians is much less than you might expect, given their similarity to birds. The wrist of Deinonychus antirrhopus specifically would not have allowed it to bend its hands even 90° with respect to the arm!

Given these limitations, most of the flexion would have to occur at the elbow, but a fully flexed elbow would mean that the hands would be hanging below the body, not held sleek and secure alongside the body. The arm orientation in my illustration above is based on what I think is probably the perfect configuration for carrying the arms: a fully-flexed shoulder, a fully-flexed wrist, and a nearly fully-extended elbow. A few other people have drawn their dromaeosaurs with the same arm configuration, like Smnt2000 and Pilsator, so kudos to them.

Illustration based on the papers linked above as well as Scott Hartman's beautiful skeletal. Gouache on 12” x 20” hot-pressed illustration board.

(via aurusallos)

27 8 / 2014

26 8 / 2014

shattered-earth:

A short guide to morphological differences in chandelure. Naturally there are variations in the litwick and lampent populations as well ;D

(via julymarte)